Our Story

Early 1900s

Marshall of Cambridge was established in 1909 by David Gregory Marshall, in a small lock-up garage in Brunswick Gardens, Cambridge as a chauffeur drive company, which was an immediate success and prompted the move to larger premises in Kings Street in 1910.

During the 1914-1918 War, the company’s premises, which had relocated to Jesus Lane in 1912 when the trade expanded to include selling cars, were used for servicing and repairing of vehicles required for the war effort.

The company’s first involvement in aviation dates back to 1912 when its mechanics helped repair the engine of a British Army airship, the Beta II, which had made an emergency landing in Jesus Green, Cambridge, just behind the Marshall garage.

1920s

It was David Marshall’s son, Arthur, who, having learned to fly after gaining an engineering degree at Jesus College, Cambridge in 1926, helped open a new aerodrome situated on the outskirts of the city beside the family home. From this airfield, known as Fen Ditton, flying training commenced in 1929 and a year later the Marshall Flying School was formed. Pictured here at the opening of the first aerodrome in 1929 are the famous British pioneer of long distance aviation, Sir Alan Cobham along with Arthur Marshall and his father David Marshall.

1930s

The company purchased the necessary farmland and in 1937 the new Cambridge Airport was officially opened by the then Secretary of State for Air, Sir Kingsley Wood. This was very opportune for re-armament was becoming an urgent national priority, along with the need for even more facilities for military aircrew training.

The opening of the Company’s second airfield presented Marshall with an opportunity to open a second garage, known as Airport Garage. Having been closed down as part of the war effort during the Second World War, both garages re-opened in 1945, with Jesus Lane concentrating on Austin Cars and Airport Garage focusing on Austin Trucks.

In 1938 a major flying training school for the RAF Volunteer Reserve was established by Marshall and training soon got into its stride with over 600 new RAF pilots trained before the Battle of Britain commenced. This increased in size and tempo so that by the end of the Second World War, the company had trained over 20,000 aircrew, including pilots, observers and flying instructors. The training scheme was universally adopted by the Royal Air Force in 1941 and continues to this day.

Alongside this training, Marshall also modified and repaired over 5,000 aircraft, ranging in size and complexity from the Oxfords and Ansons of Flying Training Command to such front-line operational types as the Mosquito, Spitfire, Hurricane, Wellington and B-17. During the Second World War, the workforce was expanded to around 3,000, including many female workers.

1940s

Postwar, aerospace engineering work continued to generate new business, civil and military, with many different types of aircraft passing through the company’s well-equipped hangars and workshops. Most of this work involved repairs, structural modifications and conversions, but also included final assembly of the last production batch of 65 de Haviland Venoms. Many Canberra bombers were modified over the years as were a number of Vickers aircraft, including the Valiant, Viking, Varsity, Valetta and Viscount. Marshall also developed its aircraft design and manufacturing facilities, becoming a natural sub-contractor to all the British aircraft manufacturing companies.

Alongside its sister companies, Marshall Motor Group flourished in the post-war era and steadily grew to include garages in Peterborough in 1946 and Bedford a few years later, as well as a number of operations in smaller towns.

1950s

Meanwhile in Marshall Aerospace, a new concrete runway was built in 1953, which was subsequently extended in 1971, and two years later the first of the very large hangars. This new accommodation could handle such aircraft as the Valiant, Britannia, Belfast and VC-10, but also, in more recent years, the Hercules.

In 1957 Marshall SV worked closely with the National Research and Development Corporation and Tom Bacon, the inventor of the fuel cell. The company and Tom Bacon successfully developed a three kilowatt fuel cell powered by hydrogen and oxygen which was demonstrated on an electrical forklift truck. This technology was later developed by Pratt and Witney in the United States and received an accolade from President Nixon when manned flight to the moon was made possible by the use of these fuel cells.

The Vickers Viscount was the first turbo-prop airliner in the world and was introduced into service in 1953, with 244 of these aircraft modified at Marshall in the following two years. Marshall also modified a number of Mk 2 Comets, BEA’s fleet of four engined turboprop Vickers Vanguard aircraft and BOAC’s Britannia fleet.

1960s

The skills developed in the Aircraft Design office during the 1960s subsequently enabled Marshall Aerospace to undertake the design and manufacture of the Concorde droop nose and retracting visor in 1967, on behalf of the British Aircraft Corporation.

Marshall Aerospace became the UK Designated company for the RAF C-130 K Hercules in 1966 and introduced the aircraft to RAF service. The company became a Sister Design Authority in 1988, and has supported the RAF fleet on a continuous basis since then. This has enabled Marshall Aerospace to win MOD engineering support contracts that have resulted in a continuous through-life association with Lockheed Martin and the C-130K Hercules. This has included complex fuselage-stretch production and major repair, modification and upgrades work for both the RAF and a large number of export customers also operating the aircraft.

1970s

1972 saw the launch of Marshall Thermo King, which specialises in the sales and after sales support of advanced, vehicle-mounted, temperature control units. With over 100 fully equipped mobile engineers on call 24 hours-a-day, 365 days-a-year, operating from 10 depots across the UK, Marshall Thermo King offers unrivalled support to transport fleet operations across the country, including those for many of the UK’s largest retailers. Its sister company, Vehicle & Tail lift Repairs (VTR), complements the business offering, specialising in the service and maintenance of commercial vehicle tail lifts.

In 1978 Marshall Aerospace won a contract from the European Space Agency to design and manufacture a space sled for medical research in order to find ways of alleviating the problems of space motion sickness experienced by some astronauts and to provide possible training methods for conditioning the human balancing system. In 1985 the sled flew for 7 days in Challenger from the Kennedy Space Centre and covered 121 orbits of the earth.

The nationalisation and subsequent privatisation of the British motor manufacturing industry during the 60s/70s/80s saw Marshall’s franchise base broaden to include most of the well-known British marques: Austin, Morris, Rover, Jaguar, Triumph, Land Rover, Leyland, Rolls Royce Bentley and Aston Martin.

1980s

The air support of the Expeditionary Forces during the Falklands Conflict in 1982 was only made possible because of the installation by Marshall of air-to-air refuelling receiver equipment in RAF Hercules aircraft. This vital modification was designed, manufactured, installed and flight trialled within 14 days, with the first aircraft in operational service within 3 weeks from the initial design request. Following this, the company modified 6 Hercules as tanker aircraft which remained in service until 1995. This hangar also accommodated DC10, MD11 and Boeing 747 aircraft.

The Falklands campaign clearly identified the requirement for a long range strategic tanker for the RAF and, in 1983, Marshall built its largest hangar to accommodate the contract to convert civil TriStars for RAF use as both freighter and tanker aircraft for which Marshall Aerospace became the Sister Design Authority.

1990s

The company also built special vehicles for the Queen’s Flight and the RAF’s Support Harrier Force; the first air portable containers for the Rapier Weapon System developed by the British Aircraft Corporation; specially modified vehicles for the Special Air Service (SAS); engineering mock-ups of armoured command vehicles and armoured signal vehicles for the Fighting Vehicles Research and Development Establishment (FVRDE).

Marshall SV has also been prime contractor for the supply of Mobile Field Hospitals, Power Pack Repair Facilities and Mobile Bakeries.

In 1992 Marshall Aerospace was selected by Orbital Sciences Corporation in the USA to perform the design and conversion of a TriStar to carry Pegasus rockets to launch satellites, with the first satellite successfully launched in 1995.

In 1995 Marshall Motor Group pioneered the development of purpose-built multi-franchise operations with the opening of the Marshall Car Centre on Newmarket Road in Cambridge, utilising land already owned by the company. With a large dedicated used car operation, a 60,000ft2 parts warehouse and 8 franchise specific showrooms and workshops, this innovative new concept led the industry.

Following on from the appointment as the Cessna Citation Service Centre for the UK in 1974, Marshall continues to this day to carry out routine servicing and maintenance on a wider range of Cessna executive jets.

With the British Armed Forces’ shift from a Cold War emphasis to Rapid Reaction Expeditionary Force, Marshall SV’s military business has evolved in recent years from Equipment Manufacturer to Systems Integrator. Today, the military business is centred on providing rapidly deployable systems for the UK MoD and military customers worldwide, for use in a wide range of situations and extreme environments as well as for humanitarian operations and by the United Nations.

2000s

Since 2000 Marshall SV has developed a number of new and innovative projects. These include a range of modular medical facilities have been developed for the National Health Service and supplied to several hospitals, including a number of operating theatre and clinic units for Addenbrooke’s Hospital. Incident Response Units and Prime Mover vehicle systems have been designed and manufactured for use by the Fire Service and solutions developed for the deployment of counter-measures equipment to satisfy the UK Government’s National Resilience program.

100 years on from the humble beginnings of the Marshall Group, Marshall Executive Chauffeur is still in business, operating a fleet of long wheelbased Jaguars, and offering a reliable and confidential service for stress free door to door travel, with experienced, uniformed chauffeurs and an expert knowledge of London, for both business and personal travel.

The Cambridge Aero Club is one of the longest established flight training schools in the world and has been training pilots for more than sixty years. The Aero Club operate a fleet of five Cessna 172SPs, an Extra 200, and a Piper PA23 Aztec, and can provide courses in JAR PPL, NPPL, IMC, Night, Tailwheel, Advanced, and Formation flying.

Marshall Motor Group is a Top 10 dealer group and the second largest privately owned dealer group in the UK and operates on the principle of delivering a flexible and personal service to all of its customers, just as David Marshall did when he started out in 1909.

In 2005, Marshall Aerospace and Defence Group were proudly involved in setting the new world record for the longest distance travelled non-stop by a commercial aircraft when Boeing flew its B777-200LR aircraft over 11,664 nautical miles for 22 hours and 42 minutes between Hong Kong and London in an easterly direction. The aircraft was fitted with a full complement of three lightweight auxiliary fuel thanks, designed and manufactured by Marshall Aerospace and Defence Group.

In 2006, 60 years on from its beginnings, history repeated itself as Marshall SV, through its Vehicle Engineering subsidiary, began work on a project to supply the MoD with 7,000 Support Vehicles, based on a MAN chassis, to replace the Army’s existing fleet with a lighter and stronger truck which will last long into the future.

Taking Marshall Aerospace into the 21st Century, was the MOD announcement, on May 31, 2006, of the placing of a £1.52 billion prime contract with Marshall Aerospace, to provide long-term in-depth Hercules maintenance and support at Cambridge and the main RAF operating base, within a partnership with Lockheed Martin and Rolls-Royce.

2010 - present

In 2015, a new chapter in the Marshall history was written when trading began on the London Stock Exchange for shares in Marshall Motor Holdings Plc.

In 2016 Marshall Aeropsace and Defence Group celebrated 50 years of world class partnership with the Royal Air Force and Lockheed Martin.

In 2017, Marshall Aerospace and Defence Group received their third Boeing Performance Award in four years. Marshall ADG design and manufacture the auxiliary fuel tank systems for the Boeing P-8 maritime patrol aircraft, which is a military derivative of the Boeing 737-800 platform and to date have delivered over 600 auxiliary tanks to support the Boeing P-8 programme.

In 2019, we celebrate the 110th anniversary of the business having been started by David Marshall in 1909. Looking back on what has been an incredible journey, we now look forward to the next exciting chapter.